Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repo.knmu.edu.ua/handle/123456789/6068
Title: Colorectal cancer: diagnosis and treatment
Authors: Isaac, Adaora
Kochubiei, Oksana
Кочубєй, Оксана Анатоліївна
Кочубей, Оксана Анатольевна
Vizir, Marina
Keywords: cancer
colon
treatment
Issue Date: May-2014
Publisher: KhNMU
Citation: Isaac Precious Adaora. Colorectal cancer: diagnosis and treatment / Precious Adaora Isaac, O. Kochubiei, M. Vizir // 7th International Scientific Interdisciplinary Conference for medical students and young doctors, Kharkiv, 15-16 May 2014 : abstract book. – Kharkiv : KhNMU, 2014. – Р. 65.
Abstract: Colon cancer is one of the most common malignancies. In the structure of cancer morbidity in the world, colorectal cancer is currently in fourth place. Colon, or colorectal, cancer is cancer that starts in the large intestine (colon) or the rectum (end of the colon). Colorectal cancer treatment involves not only specific therapies for curing or controlling the disease, but also strategies for meeting a patient's emotional and physical needs. The main types of treatment for colorectal cancer are surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Depending on the stage of the cancer, these treatments may be combined. Surgery is the most effective treatment for local colorectal tumors. Very small tumors can be removed through a colonoscope, but even with small tumors, removing the portion of the colon containing the tumor, the surrounding fat, and nearby lymph nodes is often the best treatment. Radiation therapy is treatment with high-energy rays that destroy the cancer cells. For rectal cancer, radiation is usually given after surgery, along with chemotherapy (known as adjuvant therapy), in order to destroy any cancer cells left behind. For patients with stage IV disease that has spread to the liver, treatments directed at the liver can be used. This may include: Burning the cancer (ablation), delivering chemotherapy or radiation directly into the liver, freezing the cancer (cryotherapy), surgery. Chemotherapy drugs are used to treat various stages of colorectal cancer. They include 5-flurouracil, Xeloda, Camptosar, and Eloxatin. These drugs are commonly used in combination with one another. Chemotherapy is also used to improve symptoms and prolong survival in patients with stage IV colon cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, including cetuximab (Erbitux), panitumumab (Vectibix), bevacizumab (Avastin), and other drugs have been used alone or in combination with chemotherapy. You may receive just one type, or a combination of these drugs. There is some debate as to whether patients with stage II colon cancer should receive chemotherapy after surgery. You should discuss this with your oncologist.
Description: Colon cancer is one of the most common malignancies. In the structure of cancer morbidity in the world, colorectal cancer is currently in fourth place. Colon, or colorectal, cancer is cancer that starts in the large intestine (colon) or the rectum (end of the colon). Colorectal cancer treatment involves not only specific therapies for curing or controlling the disease, but also strategies for meeting a patient's emotional and physical needs. The main types of treatment for colorectal cancer are surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Depending on the stage of the cancer, these treatments may be combined. Surgery is the most effective treatment for local colorectal tumors. Very small tumors can be removed through a colonoscope, but even with small tumors, removing the portion of the colon containing the tumor, the surrounding fat, and nearby lymph nodes is often the best treatment. Radiation therapy is treatment with high-energy rays that destroy the cancer cells. For rectal cancer, radiation is usually given after surgery, along with chemotherapy (known as adjuvant therapy), in order to destroy any cancer cells left behind. For patients with stage IV disease that has spread to the liver, treatments directed at the liver can be used. This may include: Burning the cancer (ablation), delivering chemotherapy or radiation directly into the liver, freezing the cancer (cryotherapy), surgery. Chemotherapy drugs are used to treat various stages of colorectal cancer. They include 5-flurouracil, Xeloda, Camptosar, and Eloxatin. These drugs are commonly used in combination with one another. Chemotherapy is also used to improve symptoms and prolong survival in patients with stage IV colon cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, including cetuximab (Erbitux), panitumumab (Vectibix), bevacizumab (Avastin), and other drugs have been used alone or in combination with chemotherapy. You may receive just one type, or a combination of these drugs. There is some debate as to whether patients with stage II colon cancer should receive chemotherapy after surgery. You should discuss this with your oncologist.
URI: https://repo.knmu.edu.ua/handle/123456789/6068
Appears in Collections:Наукові роботи молодих вчених. Кафедра пропедевтики внутрішньої медицини № 1, основ біоетики та біобезпеки

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